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Journal 191

Coras Iompair Éireann in 1946

BARRY CARSE

Coras Iompair Éireann was incorporated under the Transport Act, 1944, as a Statutory Company in which were merged the former undertakings of the Great Southern Railways and the Dublin United Transport Company Limited. Right from its inception, the new company was confronted with very great difficulties. It had to deal with the dual problems of merging the managements and operations of two entirely dissimilar undertakings and of restoring the condition of the railway undertaking, which had deteriorated seriously as a result of war conditions. The first Annual General Meeting of CIÉ took place in March 1946 and various proposals announced by Chairman Percy Reynolds indicated great changes in the short term. It was estimated that £5 million was needed to modernise the rail system. One of the purposes in forming CIÉ was access to funding to carry out this capital expenditure.

However, it was only with the Milne Report issued in 1948 that there was any over-arching consideration of how to achieve these objectives. The Milne Report stated that the control exercised by the board over the affairs of the Company left much to be desired. It suggested strengthening of the Board, that the duties of the Board in relation to the Government, and of the chief officers in relation to the Board, should be defined, and the policy to be pursued in regard to future development should be clearly laid down for the guidance of the staff. It also went on to detail the reports the Board should receive on a regular basis.

The main author of the Report, Sir James Milne, has been born in Dublin in 1883, was educated in Belfast; and took a degree in engineering in Manchester in 1904, after which he joined the Great Western Railway of England as a pupil engineer in the Locomotive Department. He spent his whole career with the GWR, apart from a brief period in the then new Ministry of Transport between 1919 and 1921. His rise through the ranks was swift, and he became General Manager in 1929, remaining in that position until nationalisation in 1948.

His 1948 Report for the then Irish Minister for Industry and Commerce, Dan Morrissey, prepared in just five months, is noteworthy for its detailed analysis of the condition of CIÉ locomotives and railway rolling stock, and provides the best picture we have of the state of the railways in the immediate post-war period.  

THE IRISH RAILWAY RECORD SOCIETY

Also in 1946, the founding members were preparing the groundwork to set up the Irish Railway Record Society. Among them was Bob Clements, our first Hon. Editor, and he turned out to be an expert on steam locomotives. So what was the locomotive situation that Bob Clements would have seen in that year?  

LOCOMOTIVES

I set out in Table 1, the locomotives that existed in 1946 and were suggested by the Milne Report to be retained. They total 375 locomotives. The average number of broad gauge steam locomotives in use daily during 1947 was 257, and the maximum number in use on any one day was 348. In Table 2, I set out the 88 locomotives which were deemed surplus to requirements. Milne has 89, but this total includes J25 No. 238, which had been withdrawn in 1934. Reverting now to Table 1, it will be seen that the famous J15 class numbered 96, even though they had been built between 1866 and 1903. These versatile locomotives could be seen all over the system.

Most of the J5 Class Midland 0-6-0s were built at Broadstone. They were considered very powerful and suitable for goods work on the Mullingar-Sligo line. Next we consider the Woolwich locomotives. The K1 Class was numbered 372-391. Kits of parts manufactured at Woolwich Arsenal were supplied to Broadstone to construct Nos. 372 to 383. The remainder were built at Inchicore as K1a Class. These had adjustments to the frames, and the driving wheels at 6’0’’ were 6’’ bigger than the K1 Class. There was no No. 392. The K1 and K1a classes were primarily goods locomotives, but were also suitable for passenger trains. On the passenger side, they were to be seen mainly on Westland Row–Galway/Sligo services, the Cork-Rosslare Express, and the Up and Down Cork night mails. The 34 locomotives of the J18/J19 classes can be considered together. These were the Midland’s answer to the J15 (or 101) Class 0-6-0. It was important that they be kept in service, and in 1946 they were allocated to Athlone, Broadstone, Mullingar, and Sligo. The D2, D3 and D4 classes had been built in the early part of the 20th century and 23 were earmarked for retention. This included the very fine 321 Class 4-4-0s, which had worked main line passenger trains before the introduction of the B2 (or 400) Class 4-6-0s. The 321s continued on some express passenger services on the main line and its branches. Some fine running by the 321 Class was recorded over the years by Society member Drew Donaldson, see his book Decade of Steam, written together with driver Jack O’Neill, who also contributed various articles to this Journal. The Broadstone answer to these 4-4-0s were the D5 and D6 locomotives built around the same time. The D5 had a very high axle load at 18 tons, and this restricted their use. Although both classes spent most of their time on the Midland, it was also possible to see them working from Cork shed. The D10, D11 and D12 4-4-0s were suitable for passenger trains on the Waterford-Limerick and Mallow-Tralee sections. The much older D14 and D17 classes built by the GS&WR at Inchicore were considered a very fast and reliable locomotive, suitable for branch passenger trains and the newspaper trains. Built between 1881 and 1895, 32 were scheduled to be retained, plus one member of the D13 Class - No. 89.

On the tank engine front, the B4 4-6-0Ts, the C7 4-4-2Ts, the F6 2-4-2Ts, the I3 (letter “I”) 0-6-2Ts, the J11 0-6-0Ts, the J26 0-6-0Ts and the J30 0-6-0Ts were to be retained. The B4 “Bandon Tanks” were built by Beyer Peacock for the CB&SCR and spent their time on the West Cork system, although some reached Grand Canal Street for work on the Dublin suburban. The C7 Class could be seen on the Cobh and Youghal branches. In Journal 189, page 28, there is a picture at Cobh of F6 No. 33 with a train for Cork. These locomotives also worked on the West Cork System. The 670 Class (I3) 0-6-2Ts were built in 1933 for Dublin suburban services and were considered merely “satisfactory”. There were only 5 in the fleet, and they could be found on the Dublin to Greystones coastal route. Shunting duties were allocated to class J11 at Kingsbridge and Cork. They also banked goods trains between Kingsbridge and North Wall and Cork to Rathpeacon. Another 0-6-0T locomotive class was the J26 built for the MGWR, which included No. 560 (ex-MGWR No. 115 Achill) that had worked on the eponymous branch. This locomotive was shown arriving into Waterford Manor Street with a train from Tramore in Journal 189. All 12 were to be retained in the Milne report. Finally J30 Class Nos. 90 and 100 will be well known to IRRS members. They were built for the Mitchelstown and Fermoy branch, but later moved to the Timoleague and Courtmacsherry. Locomotive No. 90 is preserved and can be seen in action on the Downpatrick and County Down Railway.

For the Cork Main Line, the GS&WR obtained the Class B2/B2a (the 400s). The first of the 400s was built at Inchicore in 1916, but civil unrest delayed completion of the class, the next one not appearing from Inchicore until 1921. Inchicore built 4 out of the 10, Armstrong Whitworth building the rest. The 400 class were confined to the Amiens Street to Cork and Mallow to Killarney sections. The B1 (500) class was built at Inchicore in 1924/1926 and its 3 members had similar route restrictions. Just before the World War II, Inchicore produced the 800 Class, which proved very suitable for handling heavy trains unaided, particularly out of Cork. Quoting again from A Decade of Steam, Drew Donaldson found it difficult to unearth 800 class performances. He mentions some notes from JM Robbins made on 17 March 1940, when Driver Mark Foley had only 6 bogies. No. 800 ran the 19.65 miles from Ballybrophy to Thurles in 19 mins 40 secs, start to stop, with a maximum of 88 mph. From there to the Junction, first stop, was run in 20 mins 11 secs. In those days, it was regular for the Mail to average 90 mph between Knocklong and Kilmallock. In 1946, from 1 July there were 6 trains, perishable, passenger or mails, each way between Kingsbridge and Cork. The three locomotive classes, 400, 500 and 800, totalled 13 locomotives to cover these 12 trains. Some of these took 6 hours 40 mins, so younger readers should note that, unlike nowadays, where trains turn around within one hour, it is quite possible that the steam locomotive would only return the next day. For example, the 06:45 “Perishable” Kingsbridge to Cork was due in at 15:05, so it is quite likely that its locomotive only returned to Dublin the next day.

Table 2 lists the locomotives to be withdrawn as per the Milne Report. Oliver Bulleid was at the disposal of the Inquiry, so the list drawn up would have carried some weight. The report states that in the interest of standardisation and the resulting economies in manufacturing and repair costs, the programme for the breaking-up of 100 locomotives should be based mainly on the withdrawal of the classes of which there were the fewest engines. The 100 locomotives includes a reduction of 11 in the narrow gauge fleet. It also stated that the reduction should be effected as and when the locomotives become due for general repairs, so that waste of repair expenditure already incurred would be avoided. In the event, it took right up to 1960 to implement the Milne Report’s proposals. The other reason for late withdrawal was the poor performance of early dieselisation efforts. So long after 1948, many of the locomotives in Table 2 could be observed still in service.

Locomotive No. 264 of the highly regarded J4 class, built at Inchicore in 1914 and rebuilt with a Belpaire superheated boiler in 1932, was selected to be the first steam locomotive to be converted to oil-firing. It entered service in September 1946, and, as the coal situation worsened over the winter of 1946/1947, a more extensive programme of conversion to oil burning followed. Although locomotives of this class were suitable for passenger work, they were particularly good on goods trains, especially beet trains based in the Waterford area.

The turntable at Westport was increased in length to 47’ 6’’, while at Thurles and Conniberry Junction, the turntables were increased to 56’ 6’’. At Claremorris, the turntable had already been extended to take the K1/K1a Classes on Knock specials.

PASSENGER ROLLING STOCK

Although Milne’s Report was prepared in 1948, little had changed since CIÉ had been set up in 1946, and Milne thus provides a pretty accurate picture of the immediate post-war situation. In regard to coaching stock, Milne stated that the stock of broad gauge carriages on 1 January 1948, exclusive of 8 Drumm Battery trains, was 763 passenger-carrying vehicles. This was broken down between 369 bogie and 394 non-bogie vehicles. The Report was concerned that the expenditure incurred in the immediate pre-war and wartime years had not been sufficient to maintain the stock in proper condition, the average age of the vehicles being about 47 years. Certain vehicles had not received a general overhaul since 1929. On the carriage availability question, 234 vehicles were NOT available for traffic on 1 January 1946. Included in the figure of 763 were 15 Restaurant Cars. Separate to all these figures are 488 “Other coaching stock”, which would have included 15 Post Office Vans. Of the 488 broad gauge “others”, 459 were non-bogie.

CIÉ inherited these vehicles from a number of Companies – D&SER, WL&WR, CB&SCR, MGWR, GS&W – and more recent vehicles from the GSR. It is difficult to quantify the vehicles from each Company which survived into CIÉ. D&SER and WL&WR vehicles had been much reduced by 1946. The best source is Desmond Coakham’s book on Irish broad carriages, where you will see pictured, inter alia, the very fine 5-compartment 6-wheel First 15D. It had a high parabolic roof contour, was 34ft 6in in length, and was built at Grand Canal Street in 1906. It was withdrawn in 1959. Another vehicle still in traffic in 1946 was the much-altered only clerestory owned by the D&SER, 12D. Originally built as one of the DW&WR’s first restaurant cars at Grand Canal Street in 1903, it was to become a semi-open gangway bogie first. It is known that many MGWR 6-wheel coaches would have been cascaded onto the D&SER system in particular, as well as other parts of the country, including the West Cork system. The MGWR 30ft 6-wheelers were built between 1890 and 1900 and their 5 compartments had seating for 60 Third Class passengers. Electric lighting and steam heating were provided. Many of these survived into 1946.

At the other end of the scale were the GSR-built coaches of 1935/37 which were of a new design, with almost no resemblance to anything heretofore. Bogie First 1144, bogie brake van 2548, Bogie Thirds 1323-1330, and First/Third Composites 2114-2115 were all built for the new Day Mail to Cork. In addition, the TPOs 2950/51 built by the GS&WR in 1919 and the dining cars 2400 and 2401 built in 1931 were also part of this Mail set. Following the building of the main line coaches in 1935, the GSR turned attention to suburban coaches, and in 1936 built two complete 6-coach sets. Their numbers were Suburban Thirds 1331-1334, Suburban Brake/Thirds 1900-1903, and Suburban Composites 2116-2119. In 1946, the 4 Pullman cars built in 1926 were still in existence, but were used only infrequently, mainly on account of their weight of 39 tons. The carriage situation is a vast subject, but in 1946, for the enthusiast, it was like travelling on a living and working museum.

GOODS WAGONS

In Table 3, it is very evident that the majority of wagons were timber-framed. The average age was about 32 years. Milne goes on to say that 7% (over 800) of the wagon stock was under repair or awaiting repair at the time of his investigation. The Report recommended that all new wagons should be built on steel underframes, the open wagons to be fitted with wooden bodies, and the covered merchandise wagons with steel framed bodies and wood sheeting. There was also mention of the new design in the UK of a triangulated steel wagon underframe, which would give a 15% saving in the quantity of steel required. The weekly circulars of 1945/6 announced the introduction to traffic of 100 new open 12-ton capacity timber-framed wagons. These were numbered 11817-11916, and were the start of a massive building programme embarked on by CIÉ. Part of this programme also was the 200 new covered goods wagons, 17012-17211, these having steel frames. The first 12 of these wagons were in traffic from June 1946.

PASSENGER SERVICES

Perishable trains were very important in 1946, and carried items such as butter, milk, fish, meat, salmon, mussels, eggs and rabbits. They also included wagons of livestock. Such trains left Kingsbridge for Cork at 06:45, 19:00 and 19:45 (this including Mails). Return trains at 20:30, 21:15 (including Mails), and 21:40. Commencing Sunday 21 July 1946, and every Sunday, a special Perishable train left Cork at 12:00 noon. This train ran from Cork to Rathmore and then to Dublin Kingsbridge. The train conveyed milk traffic offering, which was loaded in “tubed” wagons. “Tubed” was the expression used in the Weekly Circular. “Tubed wagons” are understood wagons which were fitted with a through vacuum pipe and could be run in a vacuum-braked train, but did not have their own brake equipment. The term “fitted wagon” was used for a fully braked wagon. There were 3 passenger trains also each way on the main line to Cork. The 10:00 to Cork gave a connection at Thurles to Clonmel and at Mallow to Tralee. The 08:15 Kingsbridge to Waterford ran via Carlow and Abbeyleix while the down 18:00 ran via Carlow only. The main train ran via Abbeyleix, while a separate train ran from Kildare to Kilkenny. There was only one passenger train each way on the Tullow Branch. Bagenalstown to Palace East was goods only, and in 1947, there were only 5 special trains and beet traffic for 2 months. The very important coal traffic meant that Castlecomer had 3 trains each way daily. Unlike nowadays, the Portarlington- Athlone section was considered a branch and had only one passenger train each way. At Clara, a solitary mixed train ran to Banagher. Between Maryboro (later renamed Portlaoise) and Mountmellick there were 2 mixed trains.

Reverting now to Kingsbridge, the 09:00 and 18:00 Limerick passenger services ran via Roscrea, and the Birr branch had no less than 2 mixed and 2 passenger trains. Readers might think that the current Nenagh-Limerick commuter service is a new idea, but in 1946, there was an 08:00 service, returning from Limerick at 18:15. As already mentioned, Thurles- Clonmel had one passenger train each way. One mixed train ran between Goolds Cross and Cashel and back. A passenger train and a mails/perishable operated between Limerick and Waterford. On the Limerick to Sligo line, there was one through passenger service each way, while in addition, 2 further passenger trains operated between Limerick and Ennis. On the North Kerry, one passenger train ran between Limerick and Tralee. At Ballingrane, there was a morning connection for Limerick from Foynes, and a similar arrangement applied from the 17:00 ex Limerick. On the Valentia Harbour branch, you had one passenger Tralee – Valentia Harbour, one mixed Cahirciveen to Valentia Harbour and one mixed returning to Farranfore. On the other Kerry branches the connections at Gortatlea off the two passenger trains each way were in the Mallow direction. Two mixed trains ran each way on the Kenmare to Headford Junction branch. In County Cork, one passenger service ran Mitchelstown to Fermoy and a mixed return was scheduled. On the Cork-Cobh suburban, there were 7 passenger services and one mixed each way, while the Youghal line had 1 mixed and 1 passenger train each way.

A maximum load of 20 vehicles was permitted on the 10 movements of the Cork City Railways. Parcel traffic was conveyed on these trains. The long established “ Run of Goods” to Rathpeacon had an intense timetable.

To illustrate the limited nature of the services provided, the Waterford-Cork line is a good example. On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, there was a ship arrival at Waterford Port from Fishguard at 08:00, but you would do well to catch the 08:30 to Cork. This set of coaches, presumably, returned from Cork at 14:20 and reached Waterford at 19:55, which was too late for the 18:30 sailing to Fishguard. In contrast, the services around Wexford were better, on both the North and South Wexford lines. One could travel from Waterford to Dublin via Macmine Junction and vice versa. The 09:40 Waterford to Wexford via Rosslare Strand, returning at 17:00, was described as the “Market Train”. It should be noted that there were no sailings into Rosslare in 1946; these resumed only in 1947. The 09:00 from Westland Row and the 18:05 from Harcourt Street, and similar in the Up direction, were the only services. At Woodenbridge Junction, there was no service to the Shillelagh branch, which had closed to all traffic in 1944, although a table appeared in the WTT for 1946, but with no trains. On the Harcourt Street line, there were no Sunday services, while for the rest of the week they were operated largely by Drumm battery trains. On 8 July 1946, fire was observed in the roof of the original set, and shortly after this, it is recorded that this set was two years over its guarantee period and was out of service. Another set had only a few months to run in its guarantee period, while the remaining two sets had one further year under guarantee. On 17 July 1946, the 07:00 ex Bray failed at the Home Signal outside Harcourt Street, the passengers completed their journey on foot, and the return working at 07:45 was cancelled.

On the Midland, the 4 trains from Westland Row provided 2 services to Sligo, Mayo and Galway. The 18:15 passenger from Amiens Street served all stations to Kingscourt. This and the 08:15 up had Athboy connections at Kilmessan Junction. The 12:05 from Mullingar to Cavan had CR (Call on Request) stops at Clonhugh and Inny Junction. There were 2 mixed trains on the Crossdoney to Killeshandra branch. One passenger and 2 mixed trains ran each way on the Kilfree Junction to Ballaghaderreen branch. A similar situation applied between Manulla Junction and Ballina. Both the Loughrea and Ballinrobe branches had good passenger services, but the Edenderry branch had none – just a path for a stock special. Also, the Streamstown to Clara only had a goods from Mullingar to Clara.

On the former Cork, Bandon & South Coast Railway, there was an 07:30 from Skibbereen to Cork Albert Quay, returning at 17:45, and a mixed at 14:45 from Skibbereen with no return working. Between Baltimore and Skibbereen, there were short workings. Connections into the 07:30 and 17:45 were provided from and to Clonakilty, Courtmacsherry, and Bantry. On the Cork to Macroom, there were no passenger services, but a goods ran on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Another section of the WTT shows the “Self-Contained Lines”. The sole broad gauge such line, the Waterford & Tramore, had 11 trains each way but none on Sundays. The narrow gauge listed the Schull & Skibbereen – 1 mixed each way, the Tralee & Dingle – daily goods, Cavan and Leitrim – mixed train each way Belturbet/Arigna to Dromod, and paths for coal trains from Arigna. On the West Clare, there was 1 passenger train each way Ennis to Kilrush, but with more services between Kilrush and Kilkee.

From 1941 onwards, progressively heavy cuts had been made in catering services. By 1944, no dining or tea cars ran on any train. However, in early 1946, restaurant cars were restored to an Up and Down train on the following routes: 08:15 Kingsbridge – Waterford, 09:00 Kingsbridge – Limerick, 10:00 Kingsbridge – Cork, returning on the 15:00,15:30 and 11:45 Up respectively. On the Midland, the 09:10 Westland Row to Sligo had a restaurant car and the 10:15 combined Galway/Westport had two cars. There were corresponding Up workings. By July the coverage had been increased. On the D&SE, the Circular even specified that the 09:00 Westland Row to Wexford and the 09:00 ex Wexford would be worked by cars 1M and 2M.

With the introduction of the winter timetable from 4 November 1946, TPO coaches started work on the 08:00 from Kingsbridge and the 17:30 return from Cork. The Circular pointed out that the use of net apparatus for setting down and picking up Mails will be reverted to.

At Christmas, from 16 to 24 December inclusive, a perishable train for the conveyance of poultry and similar traffic left Westland Row at 08:20 for Athlone, returning at 17:25. These were known as the “turkey trains”, and they also included the Galway and Sligo TPOs in the formation.

SPECIAL TRAINS

Although the coal situation did not improve, it was found possible to introduce Sunday services from June 1946 on the following routes: Limerick to Foynes, Cork to Youghal, Cork to Cobh, Wexford to Rosslare Strand, Waterford to Tramore, Westland Row to Bray/Greystones and Harcourt Street to Bray/Greystones. In August and September, special trains were organised, and amongst the interesting ones were a 12:00 Tralee to Glenbeigh calling at all stations and giving over 6 hours in Glenbeigh – arrival back in Tralee was at 21:25. Another was the 14:00 from Limerick to Lahinch, changing trains into the narrow gauge at Ennis. The 14:00 Athlone to Galway excursion had 1174 passengers on one of the Sundays, so therefore there were 2 return trains at 20:30 and 21:05.

GAA trains were scarce enough in 1946, but at the semi-final and final stages of the All-Ireland Championships, specials were provided. An example was Roscommon in the football semi-final with specials from Ballinlough, Boyle and Roscommon, carrying 865 fans spread over the 3 specials.

For Mullingar races on 30 November, there was a 12:20 Mullingar to Newbrook Racecourse Siding, taking 5 minutes for the short journey and connecting out of the regular 10:30 from Westland Row. The subsidiary instrument hut at Newbrook was to be opened and the District Loader was to act as Ground Signalman.

GOODS TRAINS

Goods services were very important in 1946, and if anything, outnumbered the number of passenger trains.

In 1945, 1.8 million tons of “merchandise” were carried, that is manufactured goods, and this was more than the tonnage carried in 1939. Under the category “Other Minerals” came 1 million tons consisting mainly of turf. Turf specials were still big business in 1946. A note in the Weekly Circular for the early part of the year shows a 15:00 empty train to leave Kingsbridge at 14:30 for Portarlington. A picture in Peter Rigney’s book Trains, Coal and Turf shows a loaded train in Portarlington (from Clonsast Bog) using open-top former six-wheel coaches. At Kingsbridge, they would be unloaded and the turf stockpiled in the nearby Phoenix Park. There were other turf movements, and one involved an incident between an empty turf train from Athlone to Ballina and a laden one from Westport to Ballina. As regards livestock traffic, CIÉ stated “In view of the importance to the export trade, producers and exporters alike will be glad to find that the livestock carried by the railway in every year except two during the Emergency, exceeded the total of the last peacetime year-1938”. In that year it was 1.4 million animals whereas in 1945 it was 1.7 million, the vast bulk of which was cattle and sheep.

Looking at the weekly circulars for any week, there would be about 60 specials listed, with places like Ennis sending out huge numbers of animals. It would be usual for Ballinasloe to dispatch 160 wagons over 5 specials to Dublin. A locomotive department sleeping car was provided. Also, from 07:00 to 18:00, a warning arrangement came into operation between Moate and Streamstown for Up livestock specials from Ballinasloe. The driver of each special train accepted under this arrangement had to be handed a green caution ticket at Moate. At the other end of the scale Macroom was booked to send 20 wagons out on 8 January. One feature was that a carriage for buyers on Sunday specials was to be provided if the load permitted.

I do not propose to list every goods train because space does not permit. The pattern of loose-coupled trains would be similar to later years, with which readers may be familiar. However a few trains catch my attention. There was a goods from Kingsbridge Goods to Hazelhatch serving Lucan South with a CR stop for Clondalkin. At 10:30 a perishable train ran from Kingsbridge to North Wall (LMS), while at 12:00 the GN Porter Train ran to North Wall via Amiens Street. While looking at the 13:00 Kildare- Ballylinan, I noticed that the WTT listed the Athy Brick Siding, but no trains were booked to serve it. It was located a little over a mile north of Athy station, on the Up side, and was accessed by a facing turnout coming from Athy. On what we now call the Western Rail Corridor, there was in those days in 1946, an 03:40 goods from Limerick to Sligo. A similar departure time applied when the “ Burma Road “ closed in 1975. Another note in the weekly circular dated 25 February was that repairs had now been effected to the Blackwater Bridge on the Banteer to Newmarket branch and that passenger/goods traffic by rail was to be resumed. The 07:00 goods ex Mallow became a mixed at Banteer to Newmarket and returned in similar mode at 18:30. On the Midland, a Dromod coal train left each day at 16:00 for Mullingar, connecting into main line goods trains there. It returned next morning at 09:00. In April 1946, a new siding to Messrs. Fry-Cadbury’s premises at Ossory Road was brought into use. The connection from the West Road/Church Road Up Line was operated from Church Road cabin.

There seemed to be a limited number of containers in use in 1946, but a comment from a CIÉ official said that “Policy not yet been decided ........Shortage of large vehicles in road freight fleet so container at maximum size suitable for average lorries 2 feet too short on rail wagons this involving loss of cubic carrying capacity”.

CONCLUSION

So that is a summary of CIÉ in 1946. There is still plenty for new members of the IRRS to explore and record, e.g. the developments over the following years. There were as it turned out to be many changes involving all aspects of the railways – locomotives, rolling stock, permanent way and signalling, to mention but a few. I have covered only CIÉ in 1946, but there are many other railway companies to be investigated. One of these is the County Donegal Railways , much loved by my late father, Sam Carse, who was listed on page 90 of the July 1948 Journal as a new member. I could not do an article like this without mentioning Kevin Murray whose vast contribution from those early days ensured the Society would last 70 years and more.

I would like to thank various people who helped in the preparation of this article in particular Michael McMahon. Also, Ciarán Cooney who kindly assembled and prepared the illustrations.

Table 1: CIÉ Loco Fleet: Year 1946: Steam Locos

Class

 

Total

Built

No.

B1

4-6-0.

3

1924-26

500-502

B1a

4-6-0.

3

1939

800-802

B2

4-6-0.

6

1921-23

401-403, 405-407

B4

4-6-0T

6

1909-20

463-464, 466-468, 470

D2

4-4-0.

5

1903-05

309, 312, 321-323

D3

4-4-0.

6

1905-06

327-332

D4

4-4-0.

12

1907-36

333-337, 339-340, 342-346

D5

4-4-0.

5

1902-05

545-548, 550

D6

4-4-0.

5

1909-15

540-544

D10

4-4-0.

4

1903

310-311, 313-314

D11

4-4-0.

4

1900

301-304

D12

4-4-0.

3

1902

305-307

D13

4-4-0.

1

1886

89

D14

4-4-0.

14

1881-95

60-65, 85-88, 93-96,

D17

4-4-0.

18

1883-90

1, 3-4, 9, 11-12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 52, 54-59, 98

F6

2-4-2T

6

1892-94

33-36, 41-42,

G2

2-4-0.

19

1893-98

650-668

I3

0-6-2T

5

1933

670-674

J4

0-6-0.

8

1913-14

257-264

J5

0-6-0.

23

1921-24

623-645

J9

0-6-0.

7

1903-12

249-252, 351-352, 354,

J11

0-6-0T

10

1887-1901

201-202, 207-210, 217-220

J15

0-6-0

96

1866-1903

101-111, 114, 116, 118-128, 131-141, 143-144, 146-154, 156-164, 166-168, 170-172, 174-176, 179, 181-188, 190-200, 223, 229, 232, 240-243, 253-256

J15a

0-6-0.

5

1929

700-704

J15b

0-6-0.

10

1934

710-719

J18

0-6-0.

15

1876-95

574-576, 582-593

J19

0-6-0.

19

1885-93

594-610, 612-613

J22

0-6-0.

1

1895

236

J26

0-6-0T

12

1891-94

551-562

J28

0-6-0ST

1

1892

299

J30

0-6-0T

2

1875-91

90,100

K1

2-6-0.

20

1925-29

372-391

K1a

2-6-0.

6

1930

393-398

K2

2-6-0.

2

1922

461-462

K3

2-6-0.

6

1903

356-361

K4

2-6-0.

2

1909

369-370

K5

2-6-0T

1

1894

Argadeen

L2

0-4-2ST

1

1914

Sambo

M1

0-4-0T

2

1927

280-281

 

0-4-0VB

1

1884

Pat

 

Total

375

 

 

 

Table 2: CIÉ Loco Fleet: Year 1946: Steam Locos to be Scrapped

Class

 

 

Total

Built

No.

Withdrawn

C2

4-4-2T

DSER

3

1911-24

455-457

1955-59

C3

4-4-2T

DSER

3

1893

458-460

1953-60

C4

4-4-2T

GSWR

4

1900-01

27, 30-32

1950-53

C5

4-4-2T

WLWR

4

1896-97

269-271, 274

1949-57

C7

4-4-2T

GSWR

6

1894

37,38, 317-320

1950-54

D4

4-4-0.

GSWR

1

1908

338

1959

D7

4-4-0.

MGWR

4

1910-13

536-539

1950-53

D8

4-4-0.

DSER

1

1905

454

1949

D15

4-4-0.

WLWR

2

1896-97

296, 298

1950

D16

4-4-0.

MGWR

5

1880-81

530-535

1949-53

D19

4-4-0.

GSWR

8

1877-80

2, 5-7, 10, 13, 15, 44

1949-53

E1

0-4-4T

WLWR

1

1876

279

1953

E2

0-4-4T

WLWR

1

1895

295

1954

F1

2-4-2T

DSER

6

1901-09

434-439

1950-53

F2

2-4-2T

DSER

5

1886-98

428, 430-433

1950-57

G1

2-4-0T

DSER

3

1889-91

423-425

1952-55

G3

2-4-0.

WLWR

4

1892-94

276, 290-291, 293

1949-59

I1

0-6-2T

GSWR

2

1903

213-214

1949-53

J1

0-6-0.

DSER

1

1897

448

1950

J3

0-6-0

GSWR

2

1903

211-212

1949-51

J6

0-6-0

MGWR

3

1878

619-621

1949

J8

0-6-0

DSER

4

1905-10

443-446

1955-57

J10

0-6-0T

MGWR

5

1881-90

614-618

1949-59

J12

0-6-0T

GSWR

1

1879

204

1952

J13

0-6-0T

GSWR

1

1876

Jumbo

1957

J16

0-6-0

MGWR

1

1880

567

1950

J17

0-6-0

WLWR

1

1901

234

1950

J25

0-6-0

WLWR

3

1897-1900

222, 237, 239

1949-51

M3

0-4-0ST

Allman's

1

1920

495

1949

L6

0-4-2T

GSWR

1

1890

St.Molaga

1949

P1

2-6-2T

GSR

1

1928

850

1955

 

Total

 

88

 

Table 3: CIÉ Wagon Stock: As ast 1 January 1948

Broad Gauge

Steel Frames

Timber Frames

Total

Open Wagons

1291

3076

4367

Covered Wagons

1183

3562

4745

Cattle Wagons

5

1696

1701

Timber Trucks

182

68

250

Brake Vans

124

95

219

Special Wagons

21

2

23

Miscellaneous (Powder vans)

6

65

71

Total

2812

8564

11376

 

 

 

 

Broad Gauge

Steel Frames

Timber Frames

Total

Open Wagons

0

185

185

Covered Wagons

4

183

187

Cattle Wagons

10

121

131

Timber Trucks

0

8

8

Brake Vans

0

3

3

Miscellaneous

0

1

1

Total

14

501

515

 

 

 

 

Overall Total

2826

9065

118

The remainder of this article appears in IRRS Journal number 191, published October 2016

 
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Revised: May 19, 2017 .